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Optimizing Testosterone Levels in Aging Men

Posted by sonn2019 
Optimizing Testosterone Levels in Aging Men
August 07, 2019 12:34PM
Optimizing Testosterone Levels in Aging Men


By the age of 80, a man’s testosterone level may only be 20% of what it was in his youth. This decline in testosterone occurs gradually, starting as early as his mid-30s, and can result in an increased risk of life-threatening illnesses such as obesity, diabetes, and heart disease.Nolvadex dosage

Testosterone deficiency can also lead to a number of disturbing symptoms, including loss of stamina and lean muscle mass, reduced libido, anxiety, depression, and cognitive decline. Known as the andropause, these changes are the male equivalent of female menopause. Unlike menopause, however, the drop in testosterone is so gradual that the symptoms of andropause appear over a longer period of time and are often ignored for a while or are attributed to “getting older.”

The good news is that many symptoms of testosterone deficiency can be reversed by restoring youthful testosterone levels in a variety of ways. Millions of men are now using testosterone-building supplements and even testosterone itself for this reason.

Recognition of an Increasingly Prevalent Problem
Testosterone is the primary male sex hormone that is vital for sustaining proper erectile function and libido. It is also critically involved in building muscle, burning fat, and supporting endothelial function, energy level, mood, immune function, and bone density.

Millions of men in the United States suffer from the effects of low testosterone levels. This population of testosterone deficient men will only grow in the future, as the number of aging American men increases.1

Low testosterone is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. A recent study found that men with lower testosterone levels were more likely to die from cardiovascular disease and all causes compared with men who had higher levels. The authors concluded that low testosterone may be a predictive marker for those at high risk of cardiovascular disease.2 Another review from the Baylor College of Medicine reported that there is a higher prevalence of depression, coronary heart disease, osteoporosis, fracture rates, frailty, and even dementia with low testosterone states.3

You might now be asking yourself these questions—Why hasn’t my doctor discussed these risks with me and why haven’t I been tested for low testosterone levels? Why am I just hearing about this?
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